Posts

Coitus & Coronavirus; Is Intimacy Still Possible?

For the most part and to varying degrees, we are sexual beings who crave touch and intimacy. If you have ever been to Oasis Aqualounge, you know that we strive to provide our members with an upscale, water-themed, liberated venue in which to explore and express their sexual fantasies and desires.

With the COVID-19 pandemic and the temporary closure of Oasis Aqualounge, it leaves our sex-positive community wondering if physical intimacy is even possible. In a search for information, we wanted to share this great article ‘Can I Have Sex? A Guide To Intimacy During The Coronavirus Outbreak.’

This article features the opinions of three experts; Dr. Jessica Justman, Dr. Carlos Rodriguez and Dr. Julia Marcus. Check out advice on possibilities, alternatives and risks of sexual intimacy during COVID-19.

Spring Into Your Sex Life

Add some spring into your sex life! As the daylight increases, so does our libidos. Enjoy some natural sunlight and afternoon delight at Oasis Aqualounge.

By: Fatima Mechtab

If you live in Canada, you know that the harsh, winter season can freeze our libidos. Snow storms, layered clothing and a lack of daylight can all contribute to us feeling less interested in sex.  But eventually, Mother Nature warms up and the seasons change; as the ground starts to thaw, so do our desires. 

The phrase ‘spring fever’ seems to evoke a free-spirited sense of warmth and excitement. For me, the beginning of the spring season is like a charge of new energy and it seems to correlate with the increase of light in the sky.  As the clocks ‘spring forward,’ our sex lives also seem to ‘spring ahead.’  But how exactly does the increase of daylight effect our libidos?

To start, brighter skies and sunshine have an impact on hormone production; specifically, melatonin and testosterone. Melatonin is usually produced in the body at night and/or when the sun goes down and darkness occurs. Melatonin can inhibit our libidos and is considered to a be natural fertility suppressant.  According to a New York Times article, a study conducted by Dr. Alfred Lewy, a research psychiatrist, showed that exposure to bright light can shut down the production of melatonin in some people. 

 On the other hand, testosterone is a hormone that increases sexual desire, particularly in men.  A study conducted by The Medical University Of Graz found that exposure to sunlight created a surge in testosterone production, deeming ‘sunlight as a natural aphrodisiac.’ Aly Dilks’ a sexual health expert says “…in terms of the chemicals it stimulates, testosterone is the one most responsible for our sex drive and studies show that the sun is a great factor in its production.”

Add some spring into your sex life! As the daylight increases, so does our libidos. Enjoy some natural sunlight and afternoon delight at Oasis Aqualounge.

Exposure to sunlight also helps manufacture vitamin D in the body, which correlates to the production of oestrogen; a hormone found in women, which is responsible for sex drive and maintaining the health of the vagina wall. Psychiatrist Ashwini Nadkarni, M.D. notes that “Sunlight has been shown to have an association with serotonin, a key neurotransmitter in the ability to experience pleasure.” In short, exposure to more daylight results in a chemical reaction in our bodies that in turn, affects our sex drive.

Aside from this natural phenomenon, there are other factors that contribute to us wanting to take it off and get it on, in both the spring and summer. The warmer weather leads us to shed our clothing; revealing more exposed skin. The fresh, outdoor air invigorates our spirits and boosts our confidence. We come out of winter hibernation, more eager to socialize and connect with one another.  Certain seasonal foods that can help boost libido are more readily available to us. In short, as the days become brighter and longer, our sex drives become stronger!

How can we channel all of this newfound, erotic energy? If your schedule permits, I suggest taking advantage of the natural daylight and planning some ‘afternoon delight’ with your lover(s).  Add some spice to your sex life with a sensual, outdoor picnic or sneak away to a secluded park or beach area.  Take an extended lunch break with your partner and enjoy a passionate quickie.

Add some spring into your sex life! As the daylight increases, so does our libidos. Enjoy some natural sunlight and afternoon delight at Oasis Aqualounge.

If your city has an on-premise, sex club, check their business hours to see if they are open during the day. Some clubs offer Sunday hours for afternoon delight. Others, like Oasis Aqualounge, located in Toronto, is open from 11am-3am, seven days a week and provides the perfect location for daytime play with plenty of sunlight and natural vitamin D. Cool your revving libido with a romp in the plush playrooms.

As the seasons start to change, get ready to shed those layers and rediscover passion and intimacy.  On Sunday March 8, set your clocks an hour ahead and put some spring into your sex life!

What Does Sex-Positivity Actually Mean?

What does sex-positivity actually mean? This article written by Marketing Director Fatima Mechtab from Oasis Aqualounge explores the attitudes, boundaries & active consent within this term.

By: Fatima Mechtab

Within our sexy communities and on-premise venues, such as Oasis Aqualounge, you will often hear the phrase ‘sex-positive’ buzzing around. It’s a great sounding term; light, affable and encouraging. It captures more than just the physical act of sex; it encompasses all of the surrounding areas of sexuality, such as our attitudes and perceptions. 

For many, this phrase seems to lend permission to express ourselves and our desires; we slip it on and hold its hand as we embark on a journey of sexual discovery. But aside from the times when we want to engage in sex, what does ‘sex-positivity’ actually mean? This article will examine the various aspects of this term; what it is and what it is not.

To begin, ‘sex-positivity’ involves having an open attitude towards sexuality and the sexuality of others. A sex-positive person should be able address the topic without feeling shame or disgust. While this is easily achieved when exploring areas that are of personal interest, a sex-positive attitude extends itself past personal preferences and embraces all topics with an objective sense of curiosity.

Sex-positivity embraces the notion of active consent. It recognizes that active consent goes beyond ‘no means no;’ it emphasizes that ‘only yes means yes’ and that ‘yes’ should be expressed before and throughout the duration play. Someone who is sex-positive is accepting of activities that are safe and consensual and they are non-judgmental of practices that may be different from their own. They also acknowledge that sex-positivity is inclusive of all orientations and gender identities.

What does sex-positivity actually mean? This article written by Marketing Director Fatima Mechtab from Oasis Aqualounge explores the attitudes, boundaries & active consent within this term.

There is a misconception that people who are sex-positive are void of boundaries; they want to try and like everything! That is simply not true. We all have personal boundaries; There may be sexual activities that we are uncertain of and/or curiosities that we may not be ready to try (or try yet). Sex-positivity distinguishes between a personal boundary and a judgement call.  You don’t have to want to try everything but if you are indeed sex-positive, you make space for those who like or who may want to experience something that you may not.

As much as we may enjoy the act of sex and/or kink, there are times when we may not feel like being sexual-and that’s ok! Sex-positivity grants us the freedom to accept when our libidos are low; it does not take away from our sexual identity and/or desire for our partner(s). However, feeling entitled to sex (complaining, begging, etc.) and/or constantly sexually objectifying others (yes, even your partner!) is not a sex-positive attitude.

Another fallacy is that sex-positivity can only be applied to people who are sexually active; those who are virgins, celibate and/or who identify as asexual are not included. True sex-positivity welcomes a diversity of expression and is inclusive of all identities. Sexual expression can also include masturbation, self-love and sexual-self-care. One does not always need a partner(s) in the room in order to express their sexuality.

What does sex-positivity actually mean? This article written by Marketing Director Fatima Mechtab from Oasis Aqualounge explores the attitudes, boundaries & active consent within this term.

The word ‘positive’ does suggest possessing a carefree attitude towards sex. However, there are many complexities surrounding sexuality; culture differences, past trauma and/or religious beliefs can add to the wide-range of an individual’s emotions.  Sex-positivity appreciates the varied and sometimes contradictory nature of how we process our experiences. Sex-positivity is not simple; it’s as diverse as we are.

Anyone can learn to be sex-positive. All it takes is a willingness to keep an open mind that is free of judgement, an accepting attitude towards all sexual identities and self-awareness when it comes to one’s own desires and boundaries.  If you are interested in becoming more submersed in sex-positive culture, connect with others who share those values and allow your sexual self to flourish.